Humanized "Corpse Bride" by Malro-doll

mor·i·bund

[mawr-uh-buhnd, mor-] 

adjective

1.

in a dying state; near death.
2.

on the verge of extinction or termination.
3.

not progressing or advancing; stagnant: a moribund politicalparty.
Origin: 
1715–25;  < Latin moribundus  dying, equivalent to mori-  (stemof morī  to die) + -bundus  adj. suffix

Related forms

mor·i·bun·di·ty, noun
mor·i·bund·ly, adverb
un·mor·i·bund, adjective
un·mor·i·bund·ly, adverb

Cover design by Deanne Hollinger

Textual Quote: When the Declaration of Independence was written, a way of thinking about the individual appeared which completely reversed all the old ideas. The individual would be master of his own fate. Kings were just ordinary mortals. Government would be the servant and not the master of men.  Discovery renewed the thinking of the Declaration. In 1962, Jasper Crane, a vice president of DuPont said that the government established as the fruit of the American Revolution, though fashioned after the nature of man, “wasn’t appreciated. The meaning of liberty was unknown and our heritage was almost wasted away. Then, a book appeared called The Discovery of Freedom. A new literature developed and has now reached great and influential volume.” He meant that this book laid the conceptual groundwork for virtually the entire libertarian school of thought., as well as for much of the then (and now moribund) post-war “conservative” movement.
-The epic Introduction to The Discovery of Freedom written by Roger Lea MacBride

bogdanalbei by Bruno Ricardo

Famous quote: How can the moribund old man reason back to himself the romance, the mystery, the imminence of great things with which our old earth tingled for him in the days when he was young and well?
-William James
Just to get you excited about  Autumn and Halloween far too far in advance!
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